Design, Problem Solving, and Good Taste

Subway

Image: A Case for Spaceships (Jure Triglav)

I ran across this essay recently on the role of design standards for scientific data visualization. The author, Jure Triglav, draws his inspiration from the creation and continued use of the NYCTA Graphics Standards, which were instituted in the late 1960s to unify the signage for the New York City subway system. As the author puts it, the Graphics Standards Manual is “a timeless example of great design elegantly solving a real problem.” Thanks to the unified iconography, a traveler on the New York subway knows exactly what to look for to navigate the subway system, no matter which station they may be in. And the iconography is beautiful, too.

Unimark

Unimark, the design company that designed the Graphics Standards.
Aren’t they a hip, mod looking group? And I’m jealous of those lab coats.
Image: A Case for Spaceships (Jure Triglav)

What works to clarify subway travel will work to clarify the morass of graphs and charts that pass for scientific visualization, Triglav argues. And we should start with the work of the Joint Committee on Standards for Graphical Presentation, a group of statisticians, engineers, scientists, and mathematicians who first adopted a set of standards in 1914, revised in 1936, 1938, and 1960.

I agree with him — mostly.

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