Starting Strong in 2016

464px We Can Do It

We had a busy January here at Win-Vector, and it shows no sign of abating. John and I had the pleasure of attending the first Shiny Developers Conference, held by RStudio and hosted at Stanford University (see here for a review of the conference, by a fellow attendee). The event energized us to resharpen our Shiny skills, and I’ve put together a little gallery of the Shiny apps that we’ve developed and featured on the Win-Vector blog. It’s a small gallery at the moment, but I expect it will grow.

In addition, I gave a repeat presentation of the Differential Privacy talk that I gave to the Bay Area Women in Data Science and Machine Learning Meetup last December, and am gearing up for a planned webinar on Prepping Data for Analysis in R (the webinar has not yet been announced by the hosts — more details soon).

And I’ve managed to slip in a couple of Win-Vector blog posts, too:

Using PostgreSQL in R: A quick how-to

Finding the K in K-means by Parametric Bootstrap (with Shiny app!)

We are also looking forward to giving a presentation at the ODSC San Francisco Meetup on March 31, and participating in the R Day all-day tutorial at Strata/Hadoop World Santa Clara on March 29.

2016 is shaping up to be a good year.


Image: World War II era poster by J. Howard Miller. Source: Wikipedia

Recent post on Win-Vector blog, plus some musings on Audience

 

mds

I put a new post up on Win-Vector a couple of days ago called “The Geometry of Classifiers”, a follow-up post to a recent paper by Fernandez-Delgado, et al. that investigates several classifiers against a body of data sets, mostly from the UCI Machine Learning Repository. Our article follows up the study with seven additional additional classifier implementations from scikit-learn and an interactive Shiny app to explore the results.

As you might guess, we did our little study not only because we were interested in the questions of classifier performance and classifier similarity, but because we wanted an excuse to play with scikit-learn and Shiny. We’re proud of the results (the app is cool!), but we didn’t consider this an especially ground-breaking post. Much to our surprise, this article got over 2000 views the day we posted it (a huge number, for us), up to nearly 3000 as I write this. It’s already our eighth most popular post of this year (an earlier post by John on the Fernandez-Delgado paper, a comment about some of their data treatment is also doing quite well: #2 for the month and #21 for the year).

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